• The most common reason cited by people who do not give blood is: “I was never asked”
  • One donation can help save the lives of up to three people
  • Someone needs blood every two seconds
  • About 43,000 pints of donated blood are used each day in the U.S. and Canada
  • Only 37 percent of the U.S. population is eligible to donate blood – less than 10 percent donate annually
  • One in seven people entering a hospital will need blood
  • There is no substitute for human blood
  • Blood or plasma donations that have been paid for cannot be used for human transfusion
  • After donating blood, you replace the fluid in hours and the red blood cells within four weeks
  • It takes eight weeks to restore the iron lost after donating
  • The blood used in an emergency is already on the shelves before the event occurs
  • New people are diagnosed with cancer each year and many of them will need blood – sometimes daily – during their chemotherapy treatment
  • In one year, 4.5 million Americans will need a blood transfusion
  • Shortages of all blood types usually occur during the summer and winter holidays
  • Donating blood is a safe process: your one donation is tested 13 times to ensure the safety and reliability of the blood supply for patients in need
  • Every blood donor is given a mini-physical which involves checking the donor’s temperature, blood pressure, pulse and hemoglobin level (iron count) to ensure it is safe to give blood
  • The average adult has about 10 to 12 pints of blood in their body
  • Roughly one pint is given during a donation
  • Whole blood can be processed into red blood cells, platelets and plasma
  • It is possible to donate one specific blood component such as platelets through a process called apheresis
  • Donated platelets must be used within five days of collection, so new donations are constantly needed
  • The number one reason donors say they give blood is because they “want to help others”
  • People with O negative type blood are universal donors, meaning their blood can be given to people of all blood types
  • Type O negative blood is often used in emergencies when the patient’s blood type is unknown and with newborns who need blood